That’s Enough!

I understand that obesity is becoming a health problem in the United States. I do, believe me I really do, but I don’t think that it’s a good excuse to take away our freedom of choice. There are talks about banning the sale of sugary drinks on city-owned property in Boston. An article by Stephen Smith in the Boston Globe says this:

“Concerned about the girth of employees and visitors to government agencies, Boston officials are weighing — gingerly — whether to restrict or even prohibit the sale of calorie-laden refreshments on city-owned property.”

Something’s wrong with this picture. Maybe I’m wrong, but aren’t we a country that pride ourselves on freedom? Doesn’t having the choice to drink a sugary beverage with our lunch play a major part in the way we live our lives? I don’t think anyone has the right to regulate what we drink. We already tried that with alcohol prohibition and that didn’t work. Marijuana prohibition is on the way out. What now, a sugar prohibition? I think this is absolutely ridiculous, and we’re not the only ones suffering here, this is something that might start happening all around the country!

“There are precedents: San Francisco’s mayor earlier this year issued an executive order banning sale of sugary drinks, and New York has imposed rules governing the mix of beverages in city vending machines to favor water.”

I don’t know about you, but I love soda. And if you don’t love soda, then you probably don’t think this is a big deal, and you probably think it’s ridiculous that I’m even taking the time to bitch about such a stupid thing, but if they take away our choice of beverage, what’s next? Where do we draw the line?

I can’t agree more with Colleen’s comment of how a lot of our freedoms have led our citizens down the wrong path. It’s a difficult situation, because on one side we want everyone to live healthy lives, but on the other side we don’t want to be told what to do and how to do it. I think that the effects could be devastating if we decide to take away all the products and activities that are considered “bad for you” or not “safe”.

She brings up a good point on how she tends not to drink soda because when she was a kid she didn’t drink it often and it was more of a treat than an every day thing. I think for the most part everyone needs to be able to use some restraint on themselves instead of having everyone put the restraint on for them. If we are treated like children, and have to have things taken away from us when we’ve been “bad” (becoming obese in this case) then we are naturally going to act like children (and if you look at the mindless bullshit that people consider entertainment [reality tv mostly] it’s not hard to see that’s what is happening). It doesn’t feel right to be punished, I feel like it’s the government’s way of saying “go to your room!”

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6 Responses to That’s Enough!

  1. CollMcgov says:

    Yo Paul
    So I love reading your writing because it makes me think. I understand your point and I even agree with you in most aspects. I just find it interesting because it seems like so many of our freedoms have led a large portion of our nation down the wrong path (such as your point on sugared drinks). All the while I feel that some of the most important features of our freedoms go unObserved.
    The American mindset has definitely changed. When did that shift happen in our culture?

    …Sorry for goin deep, but I think about these things
    Also I tend not to drink soda bc I didnt have it often as a kid, it was a treat for us mostly.

  2. maulpartin says:

    I can’t agree with you more on your comment of how a lot of our freedoms have led our citizens down the wrong path. It’s a difficult situation, because on one side we want everyone to live healthy lives, but on the other side we don’t want to be told what to do and how to do it. I think that the effects could be devestating if we decide to take away all the products and activities that are considered “bad for you” or not “safe”.

    You bring up a good point on how you tend not to drink soda because when you were a kid you didn’t drink it often and it was more of a treat than an every day thing. I think for the most part everyone needs to be able to use some restraint on themselves instead of having everyone put the restraint on for them. If we are treated like children, and have to have things taken away from us when we’ve been “bad” (becoming obese in this case) then we are naturally going to act like children (and if you look at the mindless bullshit that people consider entertainment [reality tv mostly] it’s not hard to see that’s what is happening). It doesn’t feel right to be punished, I feel like it’s the government’s way of saying “go to your room!”

    Don’t ever worry about going too deep, the rabbit hole never ends here. 🙂

  3. terrepruitt says:

    Well, I think it could be a good idea if the government is going to pay for our health insurance it might me a good idea stop serving the stuff they claim is responsible for causing a lot of the health problems. It seems like prevention might be a good way to go.

    Or it would be awesome if they regulated HFCS and just put sugar back in those “sugary” drinks. Or maybe limit the amount of sodas you can have, or make exercise mandatory, or . . . .

    • maulpartin says:

      It’s a good point on the healthcare…the problem I have with that though is the control issue…it’s as if we’re being treated as investments…do you think the reason that they might care so much about our health as a whole could be that it would cost them less money if we are healthy now? And that brings up a touchy issue for me because it comes back to that line — does it matter what the motive is, or does it matter that things just work out? I don’t think this will ever happen, but I’m going to take things to the extreme:

      Let’s say in a hundred years we live in a society where everyone is healthy, nobody drinks soda, they don’t even know about soda’s existence, or anything else that is unhealthy for that matter, things that may not be good for us but bring their own forms of pleasure nonetheless, and then one day they do somehow learn about these things that have been banned, and people realize that they haven’t been given the full picture, what happens then? There would be a sense of betrayel and distrust (not that I believe there isn’t already, but it would be more so). It reminds me of a the Mark Twain story, “The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg” when the stranger corrupts the incorruptible town, proving that there is no such thing as incorruptible and that trying to do so can have actually have a reverse effect.

      Love the idea on regulating HFCS and just using regular sugar instead. It tastes better and it doesn’t leave that gross film in your mouth afterwards. I went to Aruba with my family a couple of years ago and noticed that the Coke tasted different, more crisp, clean and refreshing instead of thick and syrupy, and I looked at the ingredients, which said pure cane sugar instead of HFCS…but then we get back to the money issue, because corn is such a cash crop here, they use it for pretty much everything they put on the shelves in the supermarket, so if we stop using that we may be hurting our economy too. What a mess :/

      Sorry for rambling! Thanks for reading 🙂

      • terrepruitt says:

        Oh, Dear, you got it . . . “what a mess.” I believe that the bible is correct “The love of money is the root of all evil.”

        Have you ever seen Demolition Man where everything is outlawed?

  4. maulpartin says:

    I saw that movie a long time ago, but don’t really remember much of it. I’ll have to check it out again!

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